“We Are What We Repeatedly Do”

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People respect this Aristotle guy so I’m willing to listen.  It makes sense in all aspects.  We’ve all heard, “You are what you eat”.  Think about it, if you eat crap on a regular basis then chances are you feel that way, crappy, sluggish and tired.  Making better nutrition decisions more often will help you feel better physically on a daily basis as well as likely improve the way you see yourself.

The same goes for training.  If you repeatedly lift light weights for high reps and little effort, it will show in the same way it does for those who have more lean muscle and are strong.  Although it’s not always a guarantee that that muscle can express strength and power it is noticeable.  On that note, if you desire to be a explosive/powerful athlete it is unlikely just some “big gunz” will get you the result you desire.  If you “repeatedly” train and perform powerful explosive movements, done well, then you will eventually be a more powerful and explosive athlete.  Simple, not easy.

This brings up another training related point.  If you are repeatedly beating yourself down in your training, exhaustion, vomiting, and training to failure come to mind, then like Aristotle says, you will more than likely represent that.  Keep in mind what Charles Staley says, “Fitness is a result of what you do, not how it feels to do it.”

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Obviously this whole Aristotle concept applies to more than just health and fitness.  If you are frequently a jerk, then you probably are one.  If you practice being a good human being then it is likely that you are indeed and people will generally like to be around you.

Next begs the question, how do we determine what is enough?  I like to think I’m a good person but no one is perfect.  I generally eat quality foods, but not absolutely all the time.  I think 80% is a good number.  It’s the majority of the time but not so much to make you miserable, also known as sustainability.  Sometimes you might change something in your training simply because it’s fun or you want to challenge yourself.  That’s ok, just don’t make random changes all the time.  It’s ok to not eat perfect.  Just make good choices most of the time.  Just today I read these two articles (here and here) and I think they are very relevant to this topic.  Thanks Jen Comas Keck and Michael Anderson.

– Mike Baltren