Why Training and Eating Are The Same

Avo

There are many ways to get better, faster, stronger, more toned, or “in shape”.  Call it what you will.  Some may be more effective than others but there isn’t just one way to make it happen.  Each person has to find what’s best for them based on many factors such as equipment, space, time, physical restrictions, etc.  Not only that but for the vast majority of us, you have to do what makes you happy.  The same way I might try and convince you that lifting up heavy things will get you the results that you want, you can try your best to convince me that Zumba is answer to all of my fitness questions, the bottom line is, Zumba will never be fun for me and it wont make me happy regardless of it’s effectiveness.

Eating and diet are no different.  I’ve never been a hardcore diet guy.  And by diet I don’t mean some magical way of eating for a short period of time to drastically make a change. I mean eating choices that are a lifestyle and sustainable.  More and more of late I see those sustainable eating choices in the same light as training.  In other words: Everything can work for everyone. Will it?  Who knows.  Name a diet.  It likely has some redeeming qualities.  Some more than others but you’ll have to try and see for yourself.  It’s not always the same for the person.  Imagine someone who work from home versus those that commute an hour each way to work.  The same goes for the single person living alone versus someone who is consistently preparing meals for 3 kids and a spouse.  You see where I’m going with this?

Ultimately some things (diet or exercise) will work better some of the time for some people, while others won’t.  In training, there is no perfect program but over time you can keep the movements/exercises that work best for you and discard those that, for whatever reason, you’ve tried but just aren’t the answer.  And, if you aren’t currently happy with your situation, for whatever reason, make a change.  Experiment.  Do something different be it small or potentially larger and then evaluate.  For me this has always been a simple solution in training but it’s now more clearly the answer when it comes to food choices too.

– Mike Baltren